Work Ethic Axioms


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The Reasons...

For some time I've believed that there are a number of reasons why people do what they do, but more-so why they do, with the ferocity and passion that remains unmatched. It all comes back to how they believe their work is making an impact and the well-being of the people supported by the work that is done.

Selflessness

At times it may sound over glorified but its not far from the truth, when an individual is working for something greater than themselves, they are often found able to push the limits and capabilities anticipated by their peers.

Selflessness is a great driving factor, however getting someone to find a reason to act selflessly can often be a chore if the environment doesn't already lend to this type of behavior.

Causation

It isn't always simple or easy to find the absolution behind waking up early and getting back to the grind. However it can be measured in a few factors. There is progression, because without progression it can be hard to gauge any level of impact thus lending back towards stagnant behaviors and mannerisms.

This one is not a hard objective to satisfy as a superior especially, simply appreciate the work being done and the amount of effort that goes behind it. These are simple factors and especially easy to over-look or take for granted however a little gratitude goes a long way!

Hey, I saw how much effort you put into this wanted to let you know that I appreciate it.

or

Thanks for all that you've done around here in the past (x timeframe).

These small gestures give people hope, satisfaction and honestly to the vast majority of people who work with purpose and passion, its more valuable than the amenities touted by a lot of the larger tech businesses. Free soda, hipster culture, etcetera.

Participation

One of the measures of impact a person can gain for themselves is by seeing the level of impact on a business, but coincidentally enough a little inclusion helps here.

By having an outlet to get out ideas, grievances or pleasantries; this shows by example how a person contribution lend towards the bigger picture, from that a person can cash-out on their significance and purpose at once.

Transparency

Truth (given in the right context) can benefit a great many people, but it is also a double-edged benefit in that it also gains trust. Its important to understand this in relevant terms. Truth for the sake of gossip or buying stock in someones trust is unethical. However given relevant information about the business and trusting your subordinates with the direction of the business gives them direction as well.

If you're a leader out there you know exactly the situations that is being referred to.

There isn't any reason to sugar coat a bad situation, however appealing to the humanity in others has historically proven successful for me (on an individual level).

If the overall business isn't doing great, then explaining the situation (careful here not to potentially spread panic or bad gossip) in a productive manner can yield a great level of understanding and trust by your peers in a way that will cause them to pick up additional workload just to help out, even if their own plate is full. Leverage that strength!

Dependency

There isn't anything wrong with showing a little humility in asking for assistance; and to the contrary it shows a level of maturity in knowing your own limitations and being able to ask for help where things may be a stranger to you.

This is evenly relevant to this blog post in that a worker with diligent work ethics will strive to the best most efficient solution, even at the cost of ones own ego. Its about getting the job done right after all.

In conclusion

This isn't world-changing or even unknown details, but perhaps not spoken about very often. Evenly important this isn't written by a business analyst or some metrics behavioral specialist, this is coming from a co-worker whom works hard, next to you for the enrichment the workforce.

What we all want is to be valued members of a winning team on an inspiring mission
-Graham Weston

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